Archives for March 2013

Improve Your Sales Coaching with Two Simple Steps – Part 1

Coaching1

Coaching & Fashion – Models Abound

There are many solid models for generalized sales coaching and sales rep development. Most of these models address how to coach – meaning, how to conduct an effective, interactive coaching session. Appropriately, these models usually include some sort of Socratic, dialogue-based, facilitative approach, similar to effective selling, interactive classroom training, or good, two-way human communication, in general. They center on engaging the rep, asking before telling, drawing out the rep’s experience and opinions and gaining his or her commitment, buy-in and motivation to develop and execute action plans.

Just Do It. Well.

The focus on coaching is correct. Just doing it isn’t enough, however. Quality matters. According to CEB research, noted below, rep percentage to goal is greatly impacted by the quality of coaching received. No surprise, right?SEC Coaching Effectiveness

This post will assume you already have the basics in place and can conduct an effective coaching session. While I don’t believe these existing coaching models and skills are used as frequently as they should be, and other studies suggest the same, my point remains that there are many good models. And research shows that coaching makes a difference.

Common Coaching Model Gaps

What’s often missing in these coaching models, though, is a focus on the diagnostic elements, to ensure the coaching need is accurately identified, and the effective selection of solutions, that tie to the specific type of need identified. I call this Addressing the Right Issues and Addressing the Issues Right.

Ensuring these steps occur, and are done well, is one way to radically improve the effectiveness of your coaching, without changing models. Assuming your current model is valid, of course, you can use what you have in place today or implement whatever effective, interactive models you choose.

In my past, when implementing a sales training program, I’ve often written very specific coaching programs and support materials to help managers coach to the very specific skills being taught to the reps. As I mentioned, I believe the diagnostics and solution match are often a missing element, and while I’d like to assume that the average person or even above-average sales coach always connects these dots on their own, reality has taught me that is a poor and risky assumption.

Summary: Addressing the Right Issues

  • Generally, I teach managers to use reports, metrics, and past knowledge of the rep’s behaviors and patterns to form hypotheses about current performance and then to use dialogue/conversations and direct observation to prove, disprove or shape those hypotheses.
  • This works with mindset, knowledge or skill gaps, and can often be based on what reps were recently taught, when reinforcing training, but can be done independently of specific training reinforcement.
  • The key outcome is a clearly identified mindset, knowledge or skill gap, or some combination.

Summary: Addressing the Issues Right

  • Based on the type of gap identified, the manager can then work with the rep to select an appropriate intervention.
  • The manager may need to facilitate the rep to their own aha moment, train, re-train, reinforce, coach, remove an obstacle, provide feedback, provide resources, remove or provide rewards or punishment, set clearer expectations, or simply manage the rep’s performance (meaning: hold them accountable for doing what they’ve proved they “know” and “can do,” if they choose).

In Part 2 of this series, I’ll discuss Addressing the Right Issues and Addressing the Issues Right in more detail, as well as provide some resources and tools to help you.

In the meantime, thanks for reading, be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession.

Mike

_____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle

Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads

Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment

ABSA-Intro

I’ve been thinking about this concept for about six months and have finally decided to document it here now, even as work in progress.

The name I’ve given my concept is Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment. It’s a mouthful; I know. Perhaps that name won’t stick, but it’s a “working title” and I like it for now.

It’s simpler than it sounds. I think of Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment as a string that connects related dots, which are often discussed individually, but aren’t usually strung together. It consists of:

  • The concept of a sophisticated seller identifying his prospect’s buying process (Situation Assessment) and using his or her experience and judgment (Interaction Judgment), adapting his selling efforts to it . This isn’t new by any means, but given the current buyer’s market, it’s being talked about a lot more now.
  • The power of the Five Ws and One H (Who, What, Why, When, Where and How) and Five Whys. This is a method for conducting a diagnosis and encouraging dialogue, which dates back to Roman and Greek philosophers. Even today it is a framework for teaching methods such as 4MAT and for process work, including Six Sigma.
  • My concept that exemplary sales professionals carry with them a “Batman Utility Belt” of sorts (think: Sales Utility Belt), loaded with effective mindsets, knowledge, skills, and capabilities, but also with something critical that is often overlooked — experience and judgment.

These exemplary performers possess an uncanny ability to use cues and clues to identify where they are in the buying process, diagnose the current situation (what just happened) and reach into their utility belt and pull out just what they need at that moment (their sales methodology and skills), to move the interaction forward to the next step or next stage in the buying process). Therefore, they are adaptive, and align their selling efforts to the situation. Thus the name: Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment. 

Sales professionals, and frankly, anyone who interacts and communicates with other people (meaning, everyone), often have to respond “in the moment” using their best judgment based on experience and effective behavior patterns honed through practice. While this is primarily extemporaneous, there are ways to prepare for situations with some forethought. Here is a very basic example of how the Five Ws and One H might come into play, in assessing a current situation.

ASSESSING THE BUYER SITUATION:

  • WHO: Who’s involved? What level in the organization are they?
  • WHAT: What are their top objectives (moving toward a goal) and challenges (solve a problem or avoid one)?
  • WHY: Why are these important to them now?
  • HOW: How are they planning to address this, or what are they considering? How will they fund it?
  • WHEN: When do they plan to take action?
  • WHERE: Where are the buyers in their process? How do you know (cues and clues)?

PREPARING YOUR SELLER RESPONSE:

Based on that and the current situation (what happened last, what I anticipate might happen next, or what  just happened), what do I do next?

  • WHAT: What’s my strategy? What’s my next tactical move? What do I need that I don’t have at my disposal? How do I get it?
  • WHY: Why is that the right move? What’s my rationale?
  • WHO: Who do I do it with? (From the buyer and seller team perspective)
  • HOW: How should I do it? (Models / capabilities / to what level of mastery)
  • WHEN: What’s the best timing? (Now, later, when)
  • WHERE: Where should I do it? (Now – current location, by phone, web conference, in-person, other specific location)

Adding the Five Whys to the Five Ws and One H can certainly deepen any assessment (and any dialogue, if done well and not as an interrogation). Of course, the above is a very simplistic example and you and I could both shoot it full of holes or add to it. It’s just meant as a sample. Also, once you start asking questions, the process is not linear. Even in the over-simplified example above, you’ll noticed I asked How in the string of What questions (Seller Response section).  In actual use, this is expected and recommended… purity is best left for text books and laboratories; the real world is messy.

Over the coming weeks and months, I’ll be further developing the concept of Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment, how to load a Sales Utility Belt, how to capitalize on the Five Ws and One H + Five Whys, and how to develop your Situation Assessment skills and Interaction Judgment to pull out the right knowledge and skills from your utility belt, when you need it.

Walking My Talk on Sales Nuance

I’ve also decided to create several companies, both seller and buyer firms, as well as some buying/selling situations, to be able to provide better, specific examples when demonstrating concepts and recommending approaches. This will take some time, so won’t be ready for awhile, but I believe it will be worth it.

What do you think of all this – especially the Adaptive Buying and Selling Alignment concept? I’m open to your opinions and thoughts, if you care to share.

In the meantime, thanks for reading, be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession.

Mike
_____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle
Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads

How to Increase Sales with Top Producer Research – Part 2

Best_Practices_2How to Increase Sales with Top Producer Research – Part 2

In part one of this series, I discussed the misnomer inherent in the term “best practices” and recommended “top producer practices” instead. I also pinpointed the reason for the bad reputation, since poorly executed best practices projects often fail to produce tangible results. In the projects I’ve run over the past 15 years, I’ve learned there are a few differentiating factors in making Top Producer Practices research work for you.  I ended the last post with the most common mistakes and said I’d share how to correct them, to get your “Top Producer Practices” initiative right and get the results you need.

  • Mistake 1: Studying the wrong “top reps” and therefore, cloning the wrong behaviors
  • Mistake 2: Ignoring differentiators, compared to average and low producers
  • Mistake 3: Leaving the Voice of the Customer out of the equation
  • Mistake 4: Forgetting “what to STOP doing”
  • Mistake 5: Implementing the resulting training ineffectively

 

Mistake 1: Studying the wrong “top reps” and therefore, cloning the wrong behaviors

This sounds obvious but it’s trickier than it seems. The key is doing your own analysis to identify the true top performers, the average producers, and those in the bottom two deciles. Then, you study all the groups, and look for patterns.

I stopped asking for leaders to identify study candidates years ago. Very often, companies just count revenue and hand you a ranking. While their “top reps” do have the most revenue, you have to look deeper, to weed out those who are top reps by circumstance. What’s that mean? It means they inherited a great territory from someone, were handed an RFP for an elephant in their region, or have been around forever and have adopted enough orphan accounts that they didn’t really earn, but that produce business for them anyway. Compare this to the rep who has a smaller revenue number, but who has built her territory from the ground up and grown it by 40% a year for three years running. Who do YOU want to study and clone?

Choosing your metric mix, determining performer categories, and analyzing what makes the top different is where the magic is. I wrote another post awhile back on sales performance analysis, which you can find right here, if you’d like to dig deeper.

 

Mistake 2: Ignoring differentiators, compared to average and low producers

I mentioned this already, but the key is finding the differentiating behaviors between the top performers compared to the average and low producers.

Everyone thinks to study top performers, but rarely do I see them compared to others. For example, if a top performer does a task at a certain frequency, to a certain level of mastery, that’s just a data point. If you learn that average performers do it much more often but far less well, that might mean something different than if average performers rarely do it at all. I’m relatively analytical, but I almost always engage a real statistician to analyze the results with me and to do the real geeky things that matter.

As you look at the data, sometimes things really do jump out at you. Other times, it’s less clear. By using ratings, rankings, survey data, and turning everything possible into numerical data, you can do things like the following, to find links between behaviors and results:

While there’s more here than I can write in a blog post, the bottom line is this: spend time comparing the top vs. the middle vs. the bottom, and looks for what makes a difference (patterns are best), across body of people (not just the amazing outliers). It’s far more effective than just studying the top and will likely produce the replicable, repeatable behaviors than can be taught to us mere mortals. (Acknowledging, of course, that the top 4% often do amazing things that the rest of us can’t easily pull off. Often, their behavior is just not scalable.)

You can also read more at this post or view the conference presentation embedded there.

 

Mistake 3: Leaving the Voice of the Customer out of the equation

The last time I did this work, my employer didn’t want me to include the Voice of the Customer. I was stunned, but couldn’t get past the roadblock. At one point, after the Board balked at the best practices approach, they hired an outside firm (happened to be ES Research) to independently review my work to help them decide if we should continue. ESR validated my approach, and then went on to add that we should insert the customer into the process. I was vindicated, but still couldn’t sell it. Go figure.

Your customers tell you amazing things if you ask, listen, dig deep, and engage in an authentic dialogue with them. Win-loss analysis is especially helpful. Asking what makes a real difference to them with their sales reps, and digging into the details, can be enlightening. At one service company, which was built on repeat business, we heard consistently from clients that a long lag between voicemails and return calls was an industry issue and perception of our reps and our competitors’ reps. We became fanatical about answering calls or returning them as quickly as possible. A year later, we learned that this made a difference in both new account acquisition and current account growth.

 

Mistake 4: Forgetting “what to STOP doing”

This harkens back to the previous point about differentiators, but is often more neglected than comparisons. As you figure out what average producers should continue or start doing, to perform more like a top performer, don’t forget to look for what to stop. This “avoid the worst practices” mentality can be very productive. It’s like having one foot on a gas pedal and the other on the brake, at the same time. Release the brake (stop doing what doesn’t work or hampers results), and you’ll leap forward. Very often, you can identify these practices by what the low producers do a lot of, that top producers do not. This is not always true, since as you progress through levels of performance, sometimes you need to develop new behaviors (as Marshall Goldsmith says, “What got you here won’t get you there.”) So, this one is not always clear-cut from that perspective, but even anecdotally,  top performers can usually tell you what others should just stop doing, to improve their results. I always look for this stuff, and always ask top producers about it specifically.

 

Mistake 5: Implementing the resulting training ineffectively

I probably can’t say this any better than I did in Dave Stein’s gracious interview with me, a few month ago. This can get detailed and complicated, too, but the real nugget is this:

  • Content: What you’re teaching should come from the hypotheses, analyses, and data-crunching that I’ve shared in this post. The content needs to be the right stuff that will produce results on the front-lines. If not, don’t bother even starting. It’s just an exercise in futility at that point.
  • Delivery: This goes all the way back to the instructional design quality and includes how the content is delivered. If you’re not creating real learning systems, with prework, blending learning, confirmed knowledge transfer and prep before vILT (virtual instructor-led training) or ILT programs, which should focus almost entirely on skill practice, feedback, and forming new behavior patterns, while in the class.
  • Transfer: Next, if you’re not purposefully orchestrating transfer, you are missing the boat. The best content, taught intelligently, is still often left on the classroom floor, without solid transfer plans. Broad and Newstrom’s classic “Before / During / After” method for all involved stakeholders, still works. But there are other ways (Fort Hill Company is doing some great work with this… Richardson is using a gamified mobile app that we call QuickCheck  and my friend Eric Blumthal does some cool stuff with spaced learned through his Q MINDshare product.

Bottomline? Get focused on transfer, learn everything you can, engage your sales managers in reinforcement and coaching, and you have a chance of getting your training used in the real world. And on managers… they need to know how to diagnose whether their reps are using what was taught, to what degree, and how to coach to close those gaps. “Imperative to success” is not too strong a phrase. Here’s another post that will provide additional detail – For Real Performance Improvement Put Sales Managers First .

Lastly, thanks to Michael Gerard (@michaelgerard) for his comment on the last post. I’ll end with his reminder that all this work can be for naught, if you don’t communicate throughout the process inside your organization and share the results. You can see his words and my reply at the bottom of the last post.

Well, that’s it for this post. Turned out a lot longer than I anticipated, but I hope it provided some real value for you. Thanks for reading, be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession.

Mike
_____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle
Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads

How to Increase Sales with Top Producer Research – Part 1

Best_Practices_1The term “best practice” is tossed around a lot. These days, it’s sometimes met with a groan or disbelief. There are many reasons for that, some valid, some not… but two of the most prominent reasons seem to be:

  • The reaction to the misnomer inherent in the phrase “best practices.”
  • The fact that it’s been done so poorly by so many for so long, and therefore produced such poor results so often, that it’s finally reached unpopularity with many.

Tastes Great! No, Less Filling! 

At one company where I did this work, field reps and managers loved the term, wanted to know what the best among them were doing, actually wanted to share with each other, and encouraged me to use the term “best practices” – despite my hesitancy – to encourage field adoption and engagement with the project. When discussed with the CEO and COO, however, they had a very different view. So did the Board, some of whom bristled at the term and said it was a waste of time. (There’s a future post in here about the disconnects between senior executives and their own sales force, but I’ll leave that for later.)

So… a waste of time? Really? (I often laughed at lot at work, as an internal practitioner in corporate America. I found it healthier than the alternatives.)

The fact that good ideas are often poorly executed without results and can later lead to poor organizational decision-making is also another topic for a future post. For now, let’s talk about the misnomer and bad practices surrounding best practices.

Miss Nomer is Miss Understood’s Sister

I hear these responses a lot now, when I mention best practices.

  • “Best practices aren’t really ‘best’… they’re just good practices.”
  • “Who determines whether something is best or not? Isn’t that immediately invalid?”
  • “I’ve never seen a best practices study amount to anything.”
  • “I tried that at a previous company (or we tried it previously here) and it was a waste of time.”

Uh-huh.

But I do agree with the misnomer on the term “best.” Very often, the research or analysis protocols are not established appropriately to determine what the “best practices” are. While I do think it’s possible, if you collect the right data and use sound statistical analysis (things like predictive analytics and multivariate regression analysis, for the data geeks in the crowd), I’ve come to the conclusion that the research or initiative is usually better orchestrated as “Exemplary Performer Practices” (with a nod to Tom Gilbert), or for the more mainstream among us, simply “Top Producer Practices.” (Even better would be… “The Differentiating Top Producer Practices,” but it’s understandably difficult to get buy-in for that mouthy term.)

For those who are still with me… what terms would you use? I’d be curious to hear.

Speaking of Sisters…

Moving right along… here’s a side note, worth a special mention: A sister to best practices, benchmarking, has fortunately gained in popularity. Sales Benchmark Index is a master at this. Comparing yourself to world-class organizations through benchmarking generally provides an external, “outside-in” view, and can clearly help you prioritize where to start, to make a difference in your organization.

What follows is grossly-oversimplified, but will provide a brief overview, if you’re not familiar. To benchmark, you compare your key metrics to world-class companies in your space, to see what gaps exist, and then calculate what gains could be achieved from closing those gaps.

HOW you close those gaps, however, is what matters most, after you identify and prioritize them. This is where best practices come into play.

Using best practices from the outside should be effective, if from companies in your industry with comparable product/services sets, but should still be mixed with best practices from the inside (as long as you have top producers present, with a marked, statistical gap between “top” and “average”).

  • Incorporating the repeatable practices from your own current top producers can help you close the gaps between your top producers and the rest of your team (or realistically, those in the average and above-average categories, or if you prefer, B+ through B- players). These practices are obviously very relevant to your company.
  • Inserting the relevant best practices from the outside can help you ensure you are not just replicating the “best of the worst” internally. If you have true top producers on your team, this is less of a concern, but you still can help even your top producers improve their game, with relevant, proven practices from the outside.

How Bad Practice has Undermined Best Practice

Back to the bad rap. I think the biggest issue leading to the bad reputation is that best practices projects often fail to produce a tangible result. In the projects I’ve run over the past 16 years, I’ve learned there are a few differentiating factors in making Top Producer Practices research work for you.

Here are the most common mistakes I see:

  • Mistake 1: Studying the wrong “top reps” and therefore cloning the wrong behaviors
  • Mistake 2: Ignoring the real differentiators, compared to average and low producers
  • Mistake 3: Leaving the Voice of the Customer out of the equation
  • Mistake 4: Forgetting to include what to “stop doing,” as well as start or continue
  • Mistake 5: Implementing any resulting training ineffectively

In Part 2 of this series, I will address each of these mistakes and how to correct them, to get your “Top Producer Practices” initiative right, and increase sales results.

In the meantime, be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession.

Mike
_____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle
Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads

We Live in Different Sales Worlds

Post 031413

I Love a Good Rant

In 1989, Richard Bach released his follow-up book to “Jonathan Livingston Seagull,” called “Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah.” In the book, Bach struggles to learn from his new friend, Donald Shimoda, a man Bach believes is a Messiah who quit the job, but found him – based on some mysterious past connection – to help Bach finally reach enlightenment. In one chapter, Bach makes a comment that we all live in the same world, which leads to an interesting outburst from Shimoda:

“Oh, God, Richard! You’re serious! Cancel the lunch. No hamburger, no malt, no nothing at all! Here I had thought you had reached this major knowing -” He broke off and looked down on me in angry pity. “You’re sure of that. You live in the same world, do you, as… a stockbroker, shall we say? Your life has just been all tumbled and changed, I presume, by the new SEC policy – mandatory review of portfolios with shareholder investment loss more than fifty percent? You live in the same world as a tournament chess player, do you? With the New York Open going on this week Petrosian and Fischer and Browne in Manhattan for a half million-dollar purse, what are you doing in a hayfield in Maitland, Ohio? You with your 1929 Fleet biplane landed on a farm field, with your major life priorities farmers’ permission, people who want ten-minute airplane rides, Kinner aircraft engine maintenance and mortal fear of hailstorms… how many people do you think live in your world? You say four billion people live in your world? Are you standing way down there on the ground and telling me that four billion people do not live in four billion separate worlds, are you going to put that across on me?”

Gotta love a good rant, eh?

Perspective, Prioritization, and Focus

As a young man, much of what Bach wrote in “Illusions” challenged the way I viewed the world and made me think. Yes, we inhabit the same planet. But that’s not what Bach meant, is it? He’s talking about perspective, prioritization and focus.

Today, it reminds me of the worlds we share as sales professionals.

Sales Nuances Shape Our Selling Worlds

I’ve written before about what I call “sales nuances.” You know… B2B vs. B2C, complex selling vs. simple, high-ticket vs. low, inside vs. field or channel, long-cycle vs. short, and more.

I don’t believe we all live in the same world, any more than Bach’s fictional Shimoda did. Stockbrokers, tournament chess players, barnstormers, and Mark Shale clothing consultants, do not live in the same world.

Furthering my point: a B2C life insurance agent, who is responsible for buying or generating her own leads, prospecting, cold-calling, and garnering referrals (or “favorable introductions”) like mad, nesting in CPA offices, cold-calling small business owners, and sitting at kitchen tables until 8 p.m., does not live in the same sales world as a B2B enterprise security software professional, selling million-dollar systems to C-suite executives and senior organizational leaders, bringing insight to bear to capture attention and generate value of the highest order in Fortune 100 corporations. And neither of those live in the world of the channel partner manager, educating, supporting and influencing a distributed network of Value-Added Resellers to maximize airtime and attention to gain an unfair advantage over the competition… who, by the way, is attempting the same thing.

We live in different worlds. Perspective. Prioritization. Focus.

Those Other People

Look, I Know YOU Get It… Why Don’t More “Others” Get It?

Why do so many still seem to believe that the advice we should listen to, is the generic “sales is sales is sales” stuff, that is published from so many sources daily without regard for nuance? Why are we still buying off-the-shelf training programs, and thinking they’ll make a difference? Why do we think that top sales people everywhere should be Challengers or sell with insight? For that matter, why do we even believe that the same sales processes and methodologies should be used across all product sets, channels, buyer personas, and types of sales (transactional vs. consultative and across inside, field, and channel)?

Beats me. Do you have an answer to that one? I think perhaps because it’s easier. How sad. Because it certainly isn’t as effective. And in fairness to those who get it… I fully realize that not everyone succumbs to the lure of “sales is sales is sales.”

I heard at the Forrester Sales Enablement Forum recently that we should simplify. I agree with that, and also agree with Einstein on this one. We should simplify things. We should make them as simple as possible… but NO SIMPLER. This requires perspective, prioritization, and focus, of course, but it also requires a tolerance for and the ability to sort through details and complexity, to know what to simplify… and what you can’t, or shouldn’t. Real life is messy.  And sometimes, complex.

Next, No Waiting

Coming soon, I’ll be ranting about the difference between what we know and what we do… perhaps why American Airlines trains flight attendants for 13 weeks but most companies onboard their new sales reps in a week or want 2 or 3-day event-based sales training classes. Or, why, knowing what we do about how people learn, we still cram 10 pounds of learning in a 5 pound course, or why “learning systems” are so rare, yet we know that learning in a process? All of these mysteries and more will be tackled. But I will promise you this…. I won’t treat you like we all live in the same world.

Questions for You

  1. What world do you or your reps live in? What is your perspective, prioritization and focus?
  2. What have you been able to simplify?
  3. What complexities have you learned that you must just deal with, to get results?
  4. What are you doing to better understand and capitalize or leverage the nuances, and what produces sales results in your business?
  5. How are you customizing sales and marketing solutions and aligning your company to truly serve your Target Companies, Buyer Personas, and their Buying Processes?

I’d love to hear, if you’d like to share.

Be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession.

Mike
____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle
Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads

Launch Redux – Deja Vu All Over Again

Okay, it’s true. I’m calling a “Do Over.”  I announced, in mid-November of 2012, what I’d be doing with this blog.

It hasn’t happened.

Ouch. I know.

Shortly after the announcement, I got embroiled in the end of several-month career search, navigated multiple offers (fortunately), landed a new gig, took a vacation for the holidays, and started drinking from the fire hose in January. Here we are, several months later, and this blog has languished, with promises unfulfilled.

I plan now to rectify that. Tonight, I sent emails to the first wave of sales transformation and performance improvement leaders whom I’d be proud to have as guest bloggers (with more to come), and created a blog schedule. It will be a labor of love, done after hours, probably later than it should be, and on weekends, but I aim to make it happen this time.

Really.

I will keep you posted on the Thursday guest blogger schedule, and start writing personally soon. We all need to do more to elevate our sales profession, and for whomever is listening, I will do my best here to offer thoughts with that goal in mind. I sincerely hope you’ll forgive my delay, and even more, that’ll you’ll weigh in and participate.

Be safe out there, and by all means, let’s continue to elevate our sales profession!

Mike
____________________________________________________

Mike Kunkle
Transforming Sales Results with Clear Insight & Focused Execution

Contact:
214.494.9950
<mike at mikekunkle dotcom>

Connect:
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikekunkle
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mike_kunkle
Google+: http://gplus.to/mikekunkle
Blog: https://www.mikekunkle.com
Slideshare: http://slidesha.re/MKuploads